Now that Americans have had a taste of working from home, many are reluctant to go back to the office full-time, according to a new third-party survey from Prodoscore, the developer of employee visibility and productivity intelligence software.

The company this week released the results of its research, which assesses employees’ attitudes and willingness to return to a pre-pandemic workstyle environment.

“While many American business leaders are eager to hit the resume button and have their workplaces go ‘back to normal,’ employees are more reluctant,” a release stated.

“A majority of Americans (75.6%) have returned or are expecting to return to the office full time, but nearly a third are unhappy about doing so. And, as evidenced by the Great Resignation, they are willing to put their job on the line to avoid the prospect: about a third of Americans (27.1%) reported they left their job or plan to rather than work full time in an office.”

Prodoscore president David Powell said “the pandemic caused Americans to re-examine long held beliefs about the way we work.

“We learned, for example, that we don’t have to be on site in a traditional office environment to keep the engine of commerce going. American employees have embraced the flexibility and work-life balance that working remotely delivers, and are looking to hold on to those benefits, even if they return to the office full time.”

Findings reveal that the pre-pandemic, traditional workplace is no longer the dominant model in the American business environment.

More Americans are working for a company that is implementing a hybrid work model (38.3%) than a traditional, full-time model (37.3%). Back in the office, employees are looking to bring elements of work from home with them. More than a third (39.2%) dress more casually in the office.

The survey also shows that Americans are willing to make changes in exchange for working from home. Close to 40% said they are comfortable with business leadership having visibility into their workday productivity; more than one-quarter (28.1%) will work longer workday hours; 16% will take a pay cut; and 13.4% will forfeit company retirement contributions.

“A distributed workforce, enabled by technology and productivity tools, is not the future – it is what is happening now,” said Powell.

“As business leaders we need to get on board with this, to ensure that we are using the available tools to provide the flexibility our employees require and to facilitate – and then trust in – their ability to deliver at the highest performance levels, no matter where they are physically based. To attract and retain the best talent, this needs to be our charge.”

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